All News Results

  • Walmart testing higher minimum wage for some employees

    • BY Reuters|
    • 12:49 PM ET 01/25/2020

    - Walmart Inc is testing a higher starting wage for certain newly created jobs in about 500 U.S. stores, as it looks to improve in-store experience for customers amid intense competition. The company would offer team associates, a role it recently created, a starting wage of $12 an hour, Walmart spokeswoman Jami Lamontagne said.

  • Head of U.S.' largest bank says central banks are fueling a sovereign debt bubble, negative rates won't 'end well'

    Morgan chief Jamie Dimon blames U.S. public policy for sluggish growth over past decade. Jamie Dimon doesn't have much positive to say about negative interest rates in Europe and Japan or public policy in the United States during the past decade. The JPMorgan Chase& Co. Chairman and CEO blasted the policy of negative interest rates adopted in Europe and Japan during an interview with CNBC, while arguing that economic growth in the U.S. could have been nearly double its actual rate...

  • Can Starbucks save the planet by cutting dairy? Activists and investors respond

    Soy, oat and almond milk leave their own mark. The biggest single move by Starbucks's (SBUX) customers who want to go green might be to stick with black coffee. Overall, dairy accounted for 21% of the company's global carbon footprint in 2018, the latest year for which data is available.

  • Why the coronavirus outbreak could trigger a stock-market pullback

    Bullish sentiment extremes, overbought conditions leave equity markets vulnerable: analysts. The spread of China's coronavirus is providing stock-market investors with another reason for near-term caution as major U.S. equity benchmarks trade near all-time highs, analysts said, offering a potential trigger for a near-term pullback. "Conditions in the broad market are ripe for a pause as sentiment measures and overbought conditions are at extreme levels.

  • One year after Vale dam break, pain runs deep in Brazil mine disaster town

    • BY Reuters|
    • 12:33 PM ET 01/25/2020

    Exactly one year ago a tailings dam in the Brazilian town of Brumadinho collapsed, killing more than 250 people in one of the world's worst mining disasters. For survivors and relatives of the victims still searching for answers and justice, time has been no healer. "It's the same today as it was the day of the tragedy. "My sister was a person who loved life.

  • One year after Vale dam break, pain runs deep in Brazil mine disaster town

    • BY Reuters|
    • 12:27 PM ET 01/25/2020

    Exactly one year ago a tailings dam in the Brazilian town of Brumadinho collapsed, killing more than 250 people in one of the world's worst mining disasters. For survivors and relatives of the victims still searching for answers and justice, time has been no healer. "It's the same today as it was the day of the tragedy. "My sister was a person who loved life.

  • This 'incredibly powerful' home-insurance policy will make payouts even if your property isn't damaged

    'The one industry that's not debating the nature of climate change is the insurance industry'. Climate change is making extreme weather worse and, right now, Americans are paying the price. Over the past two years, wildfires in California, floods along the Mississippi River and hurricanes in the Southeastern United States have caused tens of billions of dollars in damage.

  • Legendary investor Paul Tudor Jones says market today is like early '99, driven by 'insane monetary policy'

    He says coronavirus outbreak in Asia could be a' curveball' that triggers a significant pullback. Billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones is nothing short of flabbergasted by economic and monetary policy coming from Washington. But the current stock-market rally has long way to go, due to a combination of abnormally low interest rates and unprecedented government budget deficits stimulating the economy and pushing investors toward riskier assets, he said during an interview...

  • Wiping out the nation's student-loan debt could have unintended financial consequences for borrowers

    There could be side effects to Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders' student loan cancellation proposals, including higher tax bills for some borrowers-- but the candidates say they'll address those potential pitfalls. Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren say their student-debt cancellation plans will help young Americans and their families finally get a fresh start after being buried in debt for so long.

  • These 5 charts show the debate over whether the stock market set up for another dot-com crash

    Different measures of stock-market valuation argue for different approaches to investing. January's stock-market rally has seen U.S. equities hit record highs time and again, leaving the major benchmarks at lofty altitudes. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 2.2% so far in January, while the S&P 500 index has advanced 2.9% and the Nasdaq Composite index 4.8%, setting numerous record closes along the way.

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