Fixed Income News Results

  • Bond Investors Are Back, Even in Indonesia -- 2nd Update

    Indonesia sold $4.3 billion of bonds, including one it won't pay off for 50 years, in the latest sign that investors are regaining their appetite for risk. Just last month, investors were selling assets of all stripes so aggressively that some markets seized up under the stress. Treasurys were dumped in an attempt to raise cash.

  • Bond Investors Are Back, Even in Indonesia -- Update

    Indonesia sold $4.3 billion of bonds, including one it won't pay off for 50 years, in the latest sign that investors are regaining their appetite for risk. Just last month, investors were selling assets of all stripes so aggressively that some markets seized up under the stress. Treasurys were dumped in an attempt to raise cash.

  • Qatar to Tap Debt Markets in Test of Persian-Gulf Demand

    By Rory Jones in Dubai and Avantika Chilkoti in London. Qatar began marketing U.S. dollar-denominated bonds on Tuesday, the first Persian Gulf state to tap the debt markets since the twin headwinds of a coronavirus pandemic and collapse in oil prices tightened budgets across the region. The Qatari sale, expected to raise billions of dollars, is likely to act as a litmus test for demand among investors for further bonds from Saudi Arabia and other oil-exporting Gulf states.

  • Bond Investors Are Back, Even in Indonesia

    Indonesia sold $4.3 billion of bonds, including one it won't pay off for 50 years, in the latest sign that investors are regaining their appetite for risk. Just last month, investors were selling assets of all stripes so aggressively that some markets seized up under the stress. Treasurys were dumped in an attempt to raise cash.

  • Sizing Up the Fed's Historic Coronavirus Crisis Intervention

    By Julia-Ambra Verlaine and Tristan Wyatt. The Federal Reserve has calmed crucial parts of the markets, but other portions of the financial system remain stressed. The central bank announced aggressive measures over the past month, pledging to buy assets from Treasurys to corporate-bond funds to municipal debt.

  • Credit Markets Regain Footing -- WSJ

    Fed's efforts begin to reduce disruptions in the financial system; the Dow leaps 7.7%. This article is being republished as part of our daily reproduction of WSJ.com articles that also appeared in the U.S. print edition of The Wall Street Journal. Key parts of the U.S. debt markets are functioning again, a sign the Federal Reserve's extraordinary steps are easing a credit-market crunch.

  • RBA Warns of Big Hit to the Economy From Pandemic

    SYDNEY--The Reserve Bank of Australia left interest rates unchanged Tuesday and affirmed its current targeting of bond yields while warning the economy will be hit hard by the corona pandemic in the second quarter. The RBA's official cash rate was left at a record low 0.25%, the bank said. The three-year bond yield target was also kept at 0.25%.

  • Credit Markets Show Signs of Stabilizing After Fed Intervention -- Update

    Key parts of the U.S. debt markets are functioning again, a sign the Federal Reserve's extraordinary steps are easing a credit-market crunch. Investors say the Fed has reduced disruptions in the $17 trillion U.S. Treasurys market that had sent shock waves through the financial system.

  • Credit Markets Show Signs of Stabilizing After Historic Fed Intervention

    Key parts of the U.S. debt markets are functioning again, a sign the Federal Reserve's extraordinary steps are easing a credit market crunch. Investors say the Fed has reduced disruptions in the $17 trillion U.S. Treasurys market that had sent shock waves through the financial system.

  • Emerging-Market Economies Brace for Coronavirus Hit

    MEXICO CITY-- After slamming developed economies in Asia, Europe and North America, the coronavirus pandemic is coming for economies across the developing world. Economic output in emerging markets is forecast to fall 1.5% this year, the first decline since reliable records began in 1951, according to research firm Capital Economics. In Mexico, the U.S.' s largest trading partner, the economy could contract by up to 8%, its steepest decline since the Great Depression, Bank of America...

Search News

Filter Results

Publication Date
Topic
Provider

News, commentary and research reports are from third-party sources unaffiliated with Fidelity. Fidelity does not endorse or adopt their content. Fidelity makes no guarantees that information supplied is accurate, complete, or timely, and does not provide any warranties regarding results obtained from their use.